Places In Books I’d Love to Live

Most places in literature are dangerous and unpleasant and not a somewhere most of us would like to settle down. Theses are the exceptions, well, not all of them pleasant but they could be fun. As they say in the Assassins guild: ‘If you’re tired of Ankh Morpork, you’re tired of life.’

1: 1930’s Corfu from Gerald Durrell’s autobiographies

Such a wonderful way to grow up and a nice way to live. I am sure the reality wasn’t quite as idyllic as he made out in his autobiographies, the scorpions might be a problem but otherwise I would love it.


2: The Italy of Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

This is a book I loved at first but by the end of it I was sick of, but I could totally live in the Italy she inhabited. Eating fabulous food and learning Italian, what’s not to love.


3: Japan of Haruki Murakami

I have been fascinated with Japan for a long time now and if I could afford it I would love to live there. Especially a Japan that is portrayed in most Murakami’s work where the borders between reality and fantasy are wonderfully blurred.


4: 1970’s San Francisco from the Tales of the City by Armistead Maupin

I have read and reread this series far too many times and would love to live in the San Francisco of Michael, Mary Ann, Brian and Mona. Especially if I could have the little house on the roof of Mrs Madrigal’s place.

5: Port Coriol from A Closed and Common Orbit by Becky Chambers

If I could ever live on another planet full of alien life forms then Port Coriol from Becky Chamber’s imagination would probably be it. It seems to be a fairly peaceful place where most folks rub along ok and individual differences are seen as good things rather than causes of animosity.


6 Ankh-Morpork from the Discworld books by Terry Pratchett

I’m not sure I would like to live in Ankh-Morpork for ever, but it would be fun for a while if the assassins didn’t get me first.


7 Hogwarts from the Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling

Who wouldn’t want to either attend Hogwarts as a student, teach there, or at the very least be a gamekeeper’s assistant or something. I know my daughter half thinks/hopes that her letter has been delayed.


8 The world of Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

I know this world has a huge divide between the rich and poor and is a pretty shitty place to live if you have nothing. So if I am going to live here, I want to be rich, but it’s all about the VR experience anyway.


9 The Moon colony from Artemis by Andy Weir

Living on the moon would be cool especially with the much reduced gravity they have there and the bouncing walk.


10 Late 18C New York from The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

Ok so I would need to break out my time machine again but what I loved about this book was the sense of community that existed in the immigrant communities when the Golem and the Jinni lived


Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by the Artsy Reader Girl so head over there and check out other blogger’s lists.

Tell me what you think and/or share your Top Ten Tuesday link in the comments below.

9 thoughts on “Places In Books I’d Love to Live

Add yours

  1. Corfu, Italy and Japan – yes, yes and yes. Ankh-Morpork: well, your commentary made me laugh so much, because it’s so true! All these books have such cool places, but my question is whether I’d be able to survive there, LOLs.
    ~Lex

    Like

  2. Pot Coriol for me too. I used Closed and Common Orbit on my list too but couldn’t remember the planet name, so it was super cool to see it on your list. 🙂

    Japan for sure.

    Liked by 1 person

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